Report Type Years Available Description
Annual Reports 1965 – 2010 and 2018 Summary data on numerous topics including index, violent and property crime; case clearances; murder; firearms; arrests; city of Chicago population; domestic violence; traffic safety; juveniles; hate crimes; personnel; and calls for service.
Crime Trends 1991 – 2007 Reports include data on gang motivated murder; murder by gender; domestic violence; and robbery.
Murder Reports 1999 – 2008 Summary data on murders that occurred in Chicago by district, type of location, clearance, day month and time, motive, method, victim, and offender variables.
Domestic Violence 2014 Contains a quarterly report for March, June, and September 2014.

 

Introduction to Index Crimes 

The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program is a national program conceived in 1929 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police as a means to obtain consistent crime data across jurisdictions. Since 1930, the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) has administered the UCR Program in an effort to collect and compile data to use in understanding and improving law enforcement administration, operation, and management and to indicate fluctuations in the level of crime in America. Index crimes are the combination of ten categories of crime, selected by the FBI because of their seriousness and frequency of occurrence. These index crimes are reported to the State of Illinois and FBI through the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program.  Readers acquainted with UCR guidelines will have a stronger understanding of crime and arrest statistics.  

Violent Crime  Description 
Criminal Homicide (Murder)  Murder and non-negligent manslaughter: the willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another. Death caused by negligence, attempts to kill, assaults to kill, suicides, and accidental deaths, including first and second degree murder and excluding justifiable homicide and involuntary manslaughter (UCR counts are based on ‘Injury Date’). 

 

Rape  Penetration of the vagina or anus with any body part or object or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim, including attempted offenses. (UCR counts are based on number of victims.) 

The State of Illinois has a broader definition of Criminal Sexual Assault to be more inclusive of other types of sexual assaults.   

Robbery  The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear, including attempted offenses.  
Aggravated Battery / 

Aggravated Assault 

An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault is usually accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm, including both aggravated assault and aggravated battery. (UCR counts number of victims.) 

The State of Illinois separates Assaults (threats of violence) and Battery (infliction of bodily harm) to more granularly analyze incidents. 

Human Trafficking  Commercial Sex Acts—Inducing a person by force, fraud, or coercion to participate in commercial sex acts, or in which the person induced to perform such acts has not attained 18 years of age, including attempted offenses. 

Involuntary Servitude—The obtaining of a person(s) through recruitment, harboring, transportation, or provision, and subjecting person(s) by force, fraud, or coercion into involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery including attempted offenses. 

 

Property Crime  Description 
Burglary  The unlawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another. (UCR counts are based on the date incident occurred.) 
Theft  The unlawful taking or attempted taking of property or articles without the use of force, violence, or fraud, including all thefts, regardless of stolen property values, and attempted thefts.  
Motor Vehicle Theft  The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle.  
Arson  Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, or personal 

 

CPD CompStat Versus Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) 

Since 2011, the Chicago Police Department has reported CompStat crime totals to the public and relied heavily on the totals for CompStat meetings. The seven major CompStat offenses overlap with corresponding UCR index crime categories. As a result, there are a great number of similarities between CompStat and UCR. Both CompStat and UCR totals are obtained from the same data system and are derived by aggregating a larger set of more specific offenses. Readers familiar with the “Crimes—2001 to Present” data table available on the City of Chicago Data Portal (https://data.cityofchicago.org) will recognize these more specific offenses as “IUCR” codes in the table, along with their corresponding descriptions. 

CompStat and UCR are different because the totals have different purposes and therefore are measured differently. CompStat is a managerial accountability process. Thus, CompStat totals include high-priority crimes, measured using dates that serve as the starting point that police could reasonably respond to the crime. In contrast, UCR totals are based on a set of detailed guidelines designed to foster standardized national crime reporting. Both CompStat and UCR rely on the hierarchy rule. That is, if multiple offenses occur in the same incident, the incident is classified based on the most serious offense. Seriousness is based on UCR guidelines, with criminal homicide treated as the most serious offense, followed by the remaining violent index offenses, then property index offenses, then lesser offenses. For UCR, arson and human trafficking are exceptions to the hierarchy rule. Every incident should be reported, regardless if the incident occurred in conjunction with a more serious offense. However, CPD does not track arson or human trafficking incidents as part of CompStat. We offer this guidance below by listing and explaining CompStat crime categories. 

Violent Crime  Description 
Criminal Homicide (Murder)  The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another, including first and second degree murder and excluding justifiable homicide and involuntary manslaughter. (CompStat totals are based on the date when CPD began the murder investigation.) 
Rape  Broader than the traditional definition of “rape” (the carnal knowledge of a person forcibly and against their will), this category includes any sexual assault (completed or attempted), aggravated, or non-aggravated committed against any victim, female or male, including attempted offenses. (CompStat totals are based on number of reported incidents. Effective 2013, totals are based on the date the original police report was finalized and approved.) 
Robbery  The taking of or attempting to take anything of value from the care or custody of a person by force or threat of force, including attempted offenses. (CompStat totals are based on the date the incident occurred. Effective 2013, totals are based on the date that the original police report was finalized and approved.) 
Aggravated Battery / 

Aggravated Assault 

The intentional causing of serious bodily harm, attempt to cause serious bodily harm, or threat of serious bodily injury or death. This category includes aggravated assault, aggravated battery, and attempted murder. (CompStat counts are based on number of reported incidents limited to aggravated battery.) 
Human Trafficking  NOT included in totals for CompStat. 

 

Property Crime  Description 
Burglary  The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or theft, or an attempt to do so. (Effective 2013, CompStat totals are based on the date that the original police report was finalized and approved.) 
Theft  The unlawful taking or attempted taking of property or articles without the use of force, violence, or fraud. (CompStat totals are limited to thefts in which the value of the stolen property exceeds $500. Effective 2013, totals are based on the date that the original police report was finalized and approved.) 
Motor Vehicle Theft  The unlawful taking of or attempt to take a motor vehicle. (Effective 2013, CompStat totals are based on the date that the original police report was finalized and approved.) 
Arson  NOT included in totals for CompStat.